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VIDEO: Airlines criticize Bill C-51 for allowing minister to tell them to do “anything” he wants

Anything? The Canadian airline industry is raising concerns about a provision in the Conservatives’ C-51 anti-terror bill that will empower the public safety minister to direct them to do “anything” he wants. Marc-André O’Rourke of the National Airlines Council of Canada (a group representing Canada’s four largest airlines) told a security committee examining Bill C-51 […]

March 13, 2015

Anything?

The Canadian airline industry is raising concerns about a provision in the Conservatives’ C-51 anti-terror bill that will empower the public safety minister to direct them to do “anything” he wants.

Marc-André O’Rourke of the National Airlines Council of Canada (a group representing Canada’s four largest airlines) told a security committee examining Bill C-51 that the airline industry is concerned “with the use of the word anything” Thursday night.

Many have criticized Bill C-51 as being too vague and too broad in its language. The government’s own Privacy Commissioner Daniel Therrien is the latest to point out that the language in C-51 establishing new powers is “extremely broad.” 

Section 9 of C-51, relating to the no-fly list, states that “the minister may direct an air carrier to do anything that, in the minister’s opinion, is reasonable and necessary to prevent a listed person from engaging in any act.” O’Rourke pointed out that in addition to concerns that using front-line airline staff to carry out security functions may put them in harms way, the vagueness of the word “anything” could mean, well — anything.

WATCH:

Photo: Used under Creative Commons licenses.

WE'RE PROTECTING CANADIANS BY HOLDING THE POWERFUL ACCOUNTABLE

Journalism is an important public service. That’s why we’re prioritizing stories aimed at keeping Canadians safe and holding the powerful accountable.

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A detailed timeline of Stephen Harper’s weird, racially divided vision of Canada

What kind of leader wants this? Before Stephen Harper became an international laughingstock and trended on Twitter and BuzzFeed for telling women he knows best how they should dress, there was the divisive — and weird — campaign with racial overtones that came before it. How weird? Scroll down our 2015 timeline: January 7, 2015 […]

March 12, 2015

What kind of leader wants this?

Before Stephen Harper became an international laughingstock and trended on Twitter and BuzzFeed for telling women he knows best how they should dress, there was the divisive — and weird — campaign with racial overtones that came before it.

How weird? Scroll down our 2015 timeline:

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January 7, 2015

Gunmen in Paris execute several people at the offices of Charlie Hebdo….