Stephen Harper’s Senate meltdown
Stephen Harper’s Senate meltdown This article is more than 9 years old

Stephen Harper’s Senate meltdown

Stephen Harper just can’t catch a break on the slow-motion disaster that has become the Senate of Canada.  Facing a lengthy suspension (without pay), Mike Duffy’s lawyer has come forward to share details of just how knee-deep the Prime Minister’s Office was in Duffy’s affairs. It makes sense. Duffy was appointed to the Senate to […]

Stephen Harper just can’t catch a break on the slow-motion disaster that has become the Senate of Canada. 

Facing a lengthy suspension (without pay), Mike Duffy’s lawyer has come forward to share details of just how knee-deep the Prime Minister’s Office was in Duffy’s affairs.

It makes sense. Duffy was appointed to the Senate to travel the country on behalf of the Conservative Party on the public’s dime. No wonder there was an entire binder of Duffy’s whereabouts in the PMO

Duffy’s never-ending scandal only distracts, fleetingly, from another one of the Senate’s enfants terribles. Pamela Wallin, another PMO problem that won’t go away, beat Duffy to the punch by dispatching her lawyer to attack the move to suspend her (without pay).

The push to suspend Duffy and Wallin, along with Patrick Brazeau, isn’t going so smoothly.

The Senate’s dirty little secret – a public institution that pays for party hacks to do partisan work – is now out.

The burn for Harper? Not all senators are playing along.

Conservative Senator Hugh Segal has already said he can’t support the motion, up for debate on Tuesday.

This isn’t the first time Segal has been a thorn in Harper’s side. Not long ago, Segal spearheaded a mini mutiny in the Senate by gutting a draconian union disclosure law. Segal is also a big booster of a guaranteed annual income to tackle poverty, and he talks it up as often as he can.

Didn’t Segal get the memo? Harper just can’t catch a break with this unelected body, best described as “a relic of the 19th century.” (h/t Harper circa 2005).

Maybe things would be different if Harper had kept his word. In 2004, Harper said he “would not name appointed people to the Senate.”After he was elected in 2006, Harper went on an appointment spree, naming 57 (so far).

Photo: urbanmixer. Used under a Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 2.0 licence.

Our journalism is powered by readers like you.

We’re an award-winning non-profit news organization that covers topics like social and economic inequality, big business and labour, and right-wing extremism.

Help us build so we can bring to light stories that don’t get the attention they deserve from Canada’s big corporate media outlets.

 

Donate
PressProgress
PressProgress is an award-winning non-profit news organization focused on uncovering and unpacking the news through original investigative and explanatory journalism.

Most Shared

3906strike

Doug Ford is Looking to Cut Costs in Healthcare Staffing, Documents Show

Related Stories

McMaster University Working ‘Very Aggressively’ to Break CUPE Strike, Union Says

View the post
News

Far-Right Group Opposed to 2SLGBTQ+ Resources in Schools Protested BC Drag Queen Story Time Event

View the post
Analysis

Court Strikes Down Doug Ford’s Bill 124: Not ‘Justified’ In a ‘Free and Democratic Society’

View the post

Explainers

Human rights & inclusion

Amira Elghawaby

Here’s The Problem With Hoping Corporations Will Be Socially and Environmentally Responsible On Their Own

View the post
Politics & strategy

Jeremy Appel

The battle of the PACs in Calgary’s municipal election

View the post
Politics & strategy

Jeremy Appel

27 Different Candidates are Vying to be Calgary’s Mayor. Here Are the Biggest Issues at Stake.

View the post
Newspapers always have a business section – why not a labour section? We’ve launched a free newsletter covering labour issues in Canada.
Get Canadian Labour News You Won't Find in Corporate Newspapers.
We’ve launched a free newsletter covering labour issues in Canada.
Get Canadian Labour News You Won't Find in Corporate Newspapers