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Conservative MP: People Need to ‘Take a Deep Breath’ and ‘Get Over’ Death of George Floyd

Conservative MP Kerry Diotte dismisses calls to end police violence as an “orchestrated campaign”

June 17, 2020

Conservative MP Kerry Diotte wants everyone to “take a deep breath” and “get over” the death of George Floyd before taking action to end police brutality.

Speaking to Edmonton City Council this week, Diotte sparked criticism after he told a special meeting on racism and police violence that the public is too “emotional” about police violence to consider “drastic changes to the way we do policing.”

“I’d suggest it’s only appropriate we all take a deep breath,” the Conservative MP said. “First let’s get over the anger we feel about Mr. Floyd’s death. Let’s talk about the very serious issue of policing when everyone’s had time to heal.”

Bystander video of the police killing shows an officer pressing his knee against Floyd’s throat as Floyd begs: “Please, please. I can’t breathe.”

“These are highly emotional, emotionally-charged times,” Diotte continued. “People are rightfully angry over the horrible death of Mr. Floyd. Many people are angry at all police and people in authority, so I believe this is not the time to be embarking on drastic changes to the way we do policing.”

“Chiefly, I’m arguing that people are too angry and raw right now over the senseless death of Mr. Floyd,” Diotte explained in a statement to PressProgress. “We should pause and take a deep breath, heal from his death, then delve into the complex issue of how we conduct policing.”

Diotte also claimed calls to stop police brutality are part of an organized campaign.

“I’d be willing to bet many city councillors might have the same experience if you disregard the complaint letters that are form letters as part of an orchestrated campaign.”

 

Diotte, a former journalist with the Edmonton Sun, has been a frequent source of controversy since he was first elected in 2015.

In 2018, Diotte threatened lawsuits against Black Lives Matter Edmonton founding member Bashir Mohamed, former Natural Resources Minister Amarjeet Sohi as well as a student newspaper over unrelated instances where the Edmonton-area Conservative MP was described as a “racist.”

A number of offending tweets and articles made reference to the Conservative MP’s tweet thanking Faith Goldy for “making the media great again.”

The tweet was sent in February 2017, a few months before Goldy was fired from Rebel Media for appearing on a neo-Nazi podcast during a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville.

The Gateway, the University of Alberta’s student paper, settled the lawsuit and issued a retraction and apology before Diotte’s claim could be argued in court.

One student journalist targeted by the Conservative MP’s costly lawsuit commented that Diotte showed a lot of “nerve” by “telling racialized folks to get over their anger during an anti-racism public hearing at city hall.”

The full meeting is available here and Diotte posted a transcript of his speech to his website.

 



Update
: This story has been updated to include a statement from Kerry Diotte which was received after this article was first published.

 

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Analysis

Scott Moe Quietly Cut Vaccine Program and Protections for Workers in Saskatchewan’s 2020 Budget

Scott Moe has released a budget designed for the ‘old normal’, critics say

June 16, 2020

After a three month delay following the coronavirus pandemic, Scott Moe’s Saskatchewan Party government finally released its 2020 Budget.

Moe’s finance minister, Donna Harpauer, declared that “the world has changed” forever thanks to the pandemic and stressed the need to “rebuild and recover together.”

But critics say the budget actually leaves Saskatchewan workers more vulnerable than they were before the pandemic.