Time yet to revisit mandatory minimums?
Time yet to revisit mandatory minimums?
This article is more than 6 years old

Time yet to revisit mandatory minimums?

Tuesday was not a good day for the Conservative government’s so-called “tough on crime” agenda. Ontario’s highest court ruled that a three-year mandatory minimum sentence for possessing a loaded prohibited gun, a key part of the government’s 2008 omnibus bill, is unconstitutional. This would be a good time for the Conservative government to re-read this […]

November 12, 2013

Tuesday was not a good day for the Conservative government’s so-called “tough on crime” agenda.

Ontario’s highest court ruled that a three-year mandatory minimum sentence for possessing a loaded prohibited gun, a key part of the government’s 2008 omnibus bill, is unconstitutional.

This would be a good time for the Conservative government to re-read this brief from the John Howard Society about why mandatory minimums for gun-related offences are bad public policy, exacerbate racial bias, and are potentially unconstitutional.

And to prepare for what’s likely to come from the courts about the government’s mandatory minimums for drug-related charges, the Conservatives should re-watch this:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HA12sqAvPoU

 

Photo: YouTube

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Income inequality and what to do about it
Income inequality and what to do about it

Income inequality and what to do about it

This week, the Globe and Mail launched an in-depth series on income inequality in Canada entitled the Wealth Paradox. The two-week series will investigate various negative impacts of inequality on the lives of Canadians, highlighting how and why unequal societies provide less opportunity, less social mobility and a blinkered democracy.  This is an important – and long overdue – journalistic investment by the […]

November 11, 2013

This week, the Globe and Mail launched an in-depth series on income inequality in Canada entitled the Wealth Paradox. The two-week series will investigate various negative impacts of inequality on the lives of Canadians, highlighting how and why unequal societies provide less opportunity, less social mobility and a blinkered democracy. 

This is an important – and long overdue – journalistic investment by the self-styled national paper of record, one worth checking out.   
 
Inequality has worsened in Canada as a result of political choices governments have…