A kinder, gentler Canada? Myth busted in one graph
A kinder, gentler Canada? Myth busted in one graph
This article is more than 7 years old

A kinder, gentler Canada? Myth busted in one graph

Canada’s inequality problem is often overshadowed by the extreme situation in the United States.  The graph below, courtesy of Mother Jones, shows why: the U.S does the least of the advanced industrialized countries to combat inequality through government taxes and transfers.  The bad news? When it comes to reducing income inequality, Canada languishes at the bottom […]

November 27, 2013

Canada’s inequality problem is often overshadowed by the extreme situation in the United States. 

The graph below, courtesy of Mother Jones, shows why: the U.S does the least of the advanced industrialized countries to combat inequality through government taxes and transfers. 

The bad news? When it comes to reducing income inequality, Canada languishes at the bottom of that barrel too.

Income inequality

Things weren’t always this way.

In the late 1980s and the early 1990s, government taxes and transfers lowered the gap between rich and poor most in Canada, Denmark, Finland, and Sweden.

By the late 1990s and early 2000s, after massive cuts to social programs and taxes that once funded them, Canada had joined Switzerland and the U.S. as the countries with the smallest redistributive impact. 

This redistributive fade in Canada is considered among the most dramatic among the 34-member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

A kinder, gentler Canada? Not so much.

Photo: ninazed. Used under a Creative Commons BY 2.0 licence.

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OECD study on pensions bolsters case to expand CPP
OECD study on pensions bolsters case to expand CPP

OECD study on pensions bolsters case to expand CPP

A new report on global pensions from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development is warning that poverty among seniors is Canada is increasing – and conservative think tanks in Canada aren’t going to like the policy prescription to tackle the problem. Between 2007 and 2010, the poverty rates among people over 65 years of age was […]

November 26, 2013

A new report on global pensions from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development is warning that poverty among seniors is Canada is increasing – and conservative think tanks in Canada aren’t going to like the policy prescription to tackle the problem.

Between 2007 and 2010, the poverty rates among people over 65 years of age was falling in most OECD countries, but not in Canada. The average poverty rate of seniors in Canada actual rose about