Stephen Harper's tough talk on temporary foreign workers falls apart in one graph
Stephen Harper's tough talk on temporary foreign workers falls apart in one graph
This article is more than 6 years old

Stephen Harper’s tough talk on temporary foreign workers falls apart in one graph

Prime Minister Stephen Harper recently delivered a scathing critique of the controversial Temporary Foreign Worker (TFW) program during a roundtable with members of the ethnic media in Vancouver, saying companies have been “abusing” the program and harming Canadian workers “only for the sake of the bottom line profit.” Too bad his government has been facilitating the growth — […]

January 22, 2014

Prime Minister Stephen Harper recently delivered a scathing critique of the controversial Temporary Foreign Worker (TFW) program during a roundtable with members of the ethnic media in Vancouver, saying companies have been “abusing” the program and harming Canadian workers “only for the sake of the bottom line profit.”

Too bad his government has been facilitating the growth — and abuse — of the program since coming to power in 2006 by:

 No wonder tens of thousands of temporary foreign workers have been flooding Canada to fill “McJobs” and others under the Harper government:

Migrant workers by job type, 2012

Source: Canadian Labour CongressHow the Conservatives Expanded the Temporary Worker Pipeline by Tony Biddle, www.perfectworlddesign.ca, 2013. 

(The federal government has yet to release full statistics for 2013, but the CLC has crunched the numbers for the first half of 2013, and found that jobs in accommodation/food services account for about 20% of temporary foreign worker positions. If retail and other service jobs are included, low-wage service jobs made up about a third of all positions. The CLC has also found that with numbers for the first half of 2013, total TFW positions were 51.5% of the 2012 yearly total.) 

WE'RE PROTECTING CANADIANS BY HOLDING THE POWERFUL ACCOUNTABLE

Journalism is an important public service. That’s why we’re prioritizing stories aimed at keeping Canadians safe and holding the powerful accountable.

Did Ontario Tories really just double down on
Did Ontario Tories really just double down on

Did Ontario Tories really just double down on “right to work” agenda?

Ontario Tory leader Tim Hudak raised eyebrows when he released a jobs plan last week that didn’t include any reference to “right to work” legislation. Making union dues voluntary is popular in some conservative circles, especially in the United States. It weakens unions so they can’t bargain or organize effectively. Hudak had been talking up […]

January 21, 2014

Ontario Tory leader Tim Hudak raised eyebrows when he released a jobs plan last week that didn’t include any reference to “right to work” legislation.

Making union dues voluntary is popular in some conservative circles, especially in the United States. It weakens unions so they can’t bargain or organize effectively.

Hudak had been talking up “right to work” legislation in the lead up to an anticipated spring election, but then he didn’t mention it as part…