Rob Ford: I'm homophobic and
Rob Ford: I'm homophobic and
This article is more than 6 years old

Rob Ford: I’m homophobic and “I’m not going to change the way I am”

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford has finally dropped his longstanding excuse for skipping pride parades. Up until now, Ford has said that scheduled vacations to the family cottage have always got in the way, so he couldn’t possibly attend pride events in Canada’s largest city. Ford dropped that pretence this week at the first candidates’ forum […]

February 6, 2014

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford has finally dropped his longstanding excuse for skipping pride parades.

Up until now, Ford has said that scheduled vacations to the family cottage have always got in the way, so he couldn’t possibly attend pride events in Canada’s largest city.

Ford dropped that pretence this week at the first candidates’ forum of the 2014 mayoral campaign. He was asked about the upcoming World Pride festival in Toronto in June.

“I’m not going to go to the Pride parade,” Ford said.

“I’ve never gone to a Pride parade, so I’m not going to change the way I am.”

Let’s get this straight: Unlike sexual orientation, Ford’s learned behaviour (homophobia) is just who he is, so he can’t possibly change that.

Got it. 

Photo: photobia. Used under a Creative Commons BY 2.0 licence.

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The slippery reach of Big Oil's PR machine
The slippery reach of Big Oil's PR machine

The slippery reach of Big Oil’s PR machine

The Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers seems to be everywhere these days, selling the idea that the rapid development of the tar sands without federal emissions regulations constitutes a “balanced” approach.   The group represents big oil companies operating in Canada, so there’s no shortage of money to spend to try and shape the debate […]

February 5, 2014

The Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers seems to be everywhere these days, selling the idea that the rapid development of the tar sands without federal emissions regulations constitutes a “balanced” approach.
 
The group represents big oil companies operating in Canada, so there’s no shortage of money to spend to try and shape the debate about Canada’s energy and environmental policies.
 
Here are 4 recent examples of how CAPP goes about its business — the environment be damned.