Going once, going twice, sold!
Going once, going twice, sold!
This article is more than 6 years old

Going once, going twice, sold!

Imagine selling your prized assets, even though you use them everyday and they’re a great long-term investment? Well, that’s an idea some conservatives in a Toronto riding think their party should endorse at the Conservative convention later this week: sell “public assets where feasible with the proceeds of the sales being used to pay down […]

October 28, 2013

Imagine selling your prized assets, even though you use them everyday and they’re a great long-term investment?

Well, that’s an idea some conservatives in a Toronto riding think their party should endorse at the Conservative convention later this week: sell “public assets where feasible with the proceeds of the sales being used to pay down government debt.”

This is pretty vague, but let’s consider some scenarios under this ill-defined plan.

Does “where feasible” mean that any asset is for sale at any price if someone wants to buy it? Do we sell off the prized buildings and pay rent for their use if someone wants to buy them? What about government assets that produce an income, such as crown corporations and agencies like the Export Development Bank?

Besides, selling off assets for their book value does not reduce net debt at all. That’s because there’s an asset side to public accounts that already counts against net government debt, the most commonly used metric in international comparisons.

Photo: crossroads_foundation. Used under a Creative Commons BY 2.0 licence.

 

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A funny Senate tale
A funny Senate tale

A funny Senate tale

By any measure, it’s been a bad week for Canada’s unelected Senate. It’s also been a rough one for the Prime Minister’s new parliamentary secretary, Paul Calandra. Stephen Harper tapped Calandra to face questions about Conservative scandals after the PM had to remove Dean Del Mastro from the post when he became ensnarled in his […]

October 25, 2013

By any measure, it’s been a bad week for Canada’s unelected Senate.

It’s also been a rough one for the Prime Minister’s new parliamentary secretary, Paul Calandra. Stephen Harper tapped Calandra to face questions about Conservative scandals after the PM had to remove Dean Del Mastro from the post when he became ensnarled in his own ethics troubles.

Check out Calandra’s best “they said what?” moment this week, when he was being pressed about accountability in…