And the anti-union campaign begins
And the anti-union campaign begins

And the anti-union campaign begins

Just as registration for the Conservative Party convention opened on Thursday, the push to undermine bargaining rights kicked into gear. A pamphlet making the rounds calls on delegates to get behind a slew of proposals that are variations on one theme: undermining bargaining rights. It echoes the same statements heard from Tories in the House of Commons, […]

October 31, 2013
No media past this point

Just as registration for the Conservative Party convention opened on Thursday, the push to undermine bargaining rights kicked into gear.

A pamphlet making the rounds calls on delegates to get behind a slew of proposals that are variations on one theme: undermining bargaining rights. It echoes the same statements heard from Tories in the House of Commons, where the government has turned to a backbencher to press for amendments to the Labour Code that would make it harder for workers to form a new union  and much easier to decertify an existing one.

The pitch, in Parliament and in the pamphlet, casts the whole issue as a matter of choice and transparency  or, in the words of one proposal up for debate on the convention floor, “mandatory union membership and forced financial contributions as a condition of employment limit the economic freedom of Canadians and stifle economic growth.”

Translation: we don’t want employees to be able to bargain with employers on an even footing, and we don’t want unions to promote fair wages, decent working conditions and public services that benefit all citizens. The war with unions is, indeed, on.

Speaking of transparency, it’s too bad reporters can’t walk around freely to talk to delegates at the Conservative convention.

And if you’re looking for what’s to come this weekend, check out the pamphlet itself:

Anti-union pamphlet

Photo: habeeb_abu-futtaim_photography. Used under a Creative Commons BY 2.0 licence.

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About that Senate residency thing...
About that Senate residency thing...

About that Senate residency thing…

The Conservative government tried a new argument Wednesday to try and contain the Senate scandal. Paul Calandra, the Prime Minister’s Parliamentary Secretary, stood up in the House of Commons to chide three of Harper’s Senate appointees for not knowing where they lived. Part of the spending scandal involving Pamela Wallin, Mike Duffy and Patrick Brazeau […]

October 30, 2013

The Conservative government tried a new argument Wednesday to try and contain the Senate scandal.

Paul Calandra, the Prime Minister’s Parliamentary Secretary, stood up in the House of Commons to chide three of Harper’s Senate appointees for not knowing where they lived. Part of the spending scandal involving Pamela Wallin, Mike Duffy and Patrick Brazeau revolves around their primary residences and expense claims.

The residency question could be put to Stephen Harper. After all, he appointed…