A brief history of Jason Kenney's Twitter tirades
A brief history of Jason Kenney's Twitter tirades
This article is more than 7 years old

A brief history of Jason Kenney’s Twitter tirades

Canada’s employment minister has been busy lately getting into spats on Twitter. On Tuesday, Jason Kenney got into trouble with his early morning anti-union dig. He deleted that post just 38 minutes after posting it. But there’s plenty remaining on his Twitter feed showing his antipathy for organized labour and its position on the controversial […]

November 20, 2013

Canada’s employment minister has been busy lately getting into spats on Twitter. On Tuesday, Jason Kenney got into trouble with his early morning anti-union dig. He deleted that post just 38 minutes after posting it.

But there’s plenty remaining on his Twitter feed showing his antipathy for organized labour and its position on the controversial Temporary Foreign Worker Program.

In recent weeks, independent studies have thrown “cold water” on the idea of a skills shortage in Canada (TD Economics) and have called on the federal government to limit temporary foreign worker programs “to jobs that are truly ‘temporary'” so Canadians’ livelihoods aren’t threatened (the Institute for Research on Public Policy).

Kenney remains a greater defender of the program, pitched by the Conservative government as a solution to the overblown problem of a skills shortage. 

Check out this back-and-forth between Canada’s jobs minister and the head of the Alberta Federation of Labour.

http://storify.com/PressProgress/kenney-v-afl/embed?header=false

Photo: mostlyconservative. Used under a Creative Commons BY 2.0 licence.

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Canada knocked down during UN climate talks
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