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Conservative MP binges on steak and red wine after 5 days of poverty

Let them eat steak! Conservative MP Laurie Hawn had an eye-opening experience this week, spending five days living below the poverty line with only $1.75 per day to spend on food. And that’s good. After all, Hawn represents the riding of Edmonton-Centre and one in eight Edmontonians currently live in poverty — including one in every five […]

May 2, 2015

Let them eat steak!

Conservative MP Laurie Hawn had an eye-opening experience this week, spending five days living below the poverty line with only $1.75 per day to spend on food.

And that’s good. After all, Hawn represents the riding of Edmonton-Centre and one in eight Edmontonians currently live in poverty — including one in every five children. Food Banks Canada estimates close to two million Canadians visited a food bank last year, up 24.5% since before the 2009 recession (and one-third of food bank visitors happen to be children).

So, how did Hawn mark the end of his week-long challenge — and just minutes after the deadline passed?

With a big juicy steak, prawns and what may very well be a nice, spicy glass of shiraz:

Ah. A dry choice, indeed.

But before you go and say he didn’t learn anything living a week in someone else’s shoes, consider some of the challenges Hawn faced during his week of poverty.

For example, Hawn spent the week eating “yummy but suitably cheap gruel” — that’s his description of a stew of rice, beans, lentils, peas, carrots, onions, yams and potatoes:

And that wasn’t the only challenge he learned about.

Think about the challenge of sometimes needing to store food in tupperware containers:

And steel-cut oats?

OMG. Can you say “boorring”???

And did you know that it’s impossible to live on $1.75 a day in the Air Canada VIP lounge?

How do these people even make ends meet?

Photo: Laurie Hawn / Twitter.

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It’s official: messing with unions messes up the middle-class

Isn’t this common sense? A new study released Friday by the Centre for Policy Alternatives shows union coverage has a concrete relationship with inequality and the health of Canada’s middle-class. The study finds that individuals and families with someone represented by unions are “far more likely to find themselves in the middle and upper-middle class.” […]

May 1, 2015

Isn’t this common sense?

A new study released Friday by the Centre for Policy Alternatives shows union coverage has a concrete relationship with inequality and the health of Canada’s middle-class.

The study finds that individuals and families with someone represented by unions are “far more likely to find themselves in the middle and upper-middle class.” On the flip side, the study notes the “decline of union density in the private sector” lines up with “trends in income inequality.”

As…