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This article is more than 5 years old

Canada reacts to Conservative MP Larry Miller’s “empty apology”

Another day, another “empty apology” from a Conservative? Following the lead of caucus colleague John Williamson, who apologized recently for his “whities” and “brown people” comment,  it was Larry Miller’s turn on Tuesday. After PressProgress reported that Miller had taken to the airwaves in his Ontario riding and told Muslim women to “stay the hell where you came […]

March 17, 2015

Another day, another “empty apology” from a Conservative?

Following the lead of caucus colleague John Williamson, who apologized recently for his “whities” and “brown people” comment,  it was Larry Miller’s turn on Tuesday.

After PressProgress reported that Miller had taken to the airwaves in his Ontario riding and told Muslim women to “stay the hell where you came from” if they insisted on wearing a niqab during Canadian citizenship ceremonies, the media firestorm was swift.

Miller, dubbed the “keeper of the flame” and “the voice” in Stephen Harper’s ear,  was quick to issue an apology, saying his comments “went too far.” 

Then the Twittersphere, still recovering from racially divisive comments made by  Conservatives since January, had its say.

Some didn’t accept Miller’s “empty apology”:

 

 

Some opted for humour:

 

 

 

Some questioned Stephen Harper’s reaction:

 

For the record, the Prime Minister’s Office called the comments “beyond our clear position.”

 

Things are so bad, some joked Miller’s comment was meant to distract from the “crappy economy”:

 

By the way, economic experts say that the Conservative economy is headed into a “prolonged period of misery.”

They’re also so bad, people joked about Conservative party strategy: 

 

 

Photo: Twitter

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5 compelling charts showing how a national pharmacare plan would save Canada billions

Well, here’s a healthy dose of news. A national pharmacare plan would save Canada $7.3 billion — reducing total spending on prescription drugs by 32%, according to a new study published Monday in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. And that benefit comes at an affordable price to taxpayers: researchers estimated the average annual cost to […]

March 16, 2015

Well, here’s a healthy dose of news.

A national pharmacare plan would save Canada $7.3 billion — reducing total spending on prescription drugs by 32%, according to a new study published Monday in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

And that benefit comes at an affordable price to taxpayers: researchers estimated the average annual cost to government would be $1 billion.

Previous research indicates that 1 in 10 Canadians can’t afford to fill their prescriptions.

The study…