A new way to attack environmental groups
A new way to attack environmental groups
This article is more than 6 years old

A new way to attack environmental groups

The Harper government hasn’t tried to hide its dislike for environmental groups. That became plainly obvious in 2012, when the federal budget created a special fund to target groups with charitable status to determine if they engaged in too much political activity. Environmental groups discovered what the budget announcement meant: auditors from Canada Revenue Agency […]

October 28, 2013

The Harper government hasn’t tried to hide its dislike for environmental groups. That became plainly obvious in 2012, when the federal budget created a special fund to target groups with charitable status to determine if they engaged in too much political activity.

Environmental groups discovered what the budget announcement meant: auditors from Canada Revenue Agency were all over them.

The audit program has been a bit of a bust. One group (a non-green org) has lost its charitable status. (The current law includes a 10 percent rule, meaning groups can do political advocacy work, including denouncing or supporting government policy, up to 10 percent of their time.) 

It looks like a riding association in Edmonton has a solution, and the group wants the party to get behind the idea at the party’s convention.

The “government must review the laws governing charities in Canada with a view to tightening the rules on acceptable activity, the use of a registered charity number, disclosure requirements….”

Photo: vsellis. Used under a Creative Commons BY-SA 2.0 licence.

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A funny Senate tale
A funny Senate tale

A funny Senate tale

By any measure, it’s been a bad week for Canada’s unelected Senate. It’s also been a rough one for the Prime Minister’s new parliamentary secretary, Paul Calandra. Stephen Harper tapped Calandra to face questions about Conservative scandals after the PM had to remove Dean Del Mastro from the post when he became ensnarled in his […]

October 25, 2013

By any measure, it’s been a bad week for Canada’s unelected Senate.

It’s also been a rough one for the Prime Minister’s new parliamentary secretary, Paul Calandra. Stephen Harper tapped Calandra to face questions about Conservative scandals after the PM had to remove Dean Del Mastro from the post when he became ensnarled in his own ethics troubles.

Check out Calandra’s best “they said what?” moment this week, when he was being pressed about accountability in…